Discovering the world with relentless curiosity

Tag: world heritage site

Tiananmen Square & The Forbidden City

Beijing’s Forbidden City is perhaps China’s most famous ancient museum, second to the impressive Great Wall as tourists’ attractions. We were warned of the crowds and unlike other iconic landmarks…

Beijing’s Forbidden City is perhaps China’s most famous ancient museum, second to the impressive Great Wall as tourists’ attractions. We were warned of the crowds and unlike other iconic landmarks around the world, in China, local attractions attract the local crowd. So when we got to Tiananmen Square on a Sunday morning, we were met with an endless sea of people – mostly Chinese.

The sprawling Square is the world’s largest, approximately 99 acres and is surprisingly devoid of trees, benches or sitting areas. Tiananmen Square was just a glimpse of the expanse within the Forbidden City and it entailed a LOT of walking. If you’re in Beijing during summer, bring lots of water to keep hydrated, snacks to satisfy the hunger pangs and cover for shade – either a cap or umbrella – the heat coupled with humidity can be very draining.

Beijing_iphone13

Tiananmen Square and the Forbidden city are located directly opposite from each other. There are two subway stops, one on each end – Tiananmen East and Tiananmen West, both on Line 1. You can take either. Once you exit, just follow the crowd and you’d emerge at the Square’s imposing walls. Guards are stationed along the wall and they look intimidating, however, excited groups of tourists and kite flyers at the Square seemed unperturbed by their presence. Kite flyers pranced around as their kites dance in the air, tour guides wave colourful flags and some even blow resounding whistles to get their group’s attention. It’s quite chaotic and can be overwhelming trying to navigate through the crowd.

Beijing34

We walked through the arched entrance with Chairman Mao staring right at us from above and into what is known as the Forbidden City. For nearly 500 years, this city (quite literally for its sheer size) have housed the Ming and Qing dynasty emperors up until 1911. A decade and more after the end of the dynasty, in 1925, the Forbidden City was open to the public and earned its place as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site in 1987.

Beijing36Beijing_iphone15

We followed the crowd in and was already spellbound by the size of the compound and beautiful courtyard-style buildings before us. Queues of people were seen on our left and signages read “Tickets” – we stood in one of the many lines and hoped that the wait would not be long. There were easily a few hundred people waiting for tickets – thankfully there were sufficient ticket counters to cater for the crowd. We ended up waiting 45 minutes for our tickets and proceeded in.

Beijing_iphone17Beijing27

Security is tight and our bags were scanned prior to entry. Audio guides in various languages are available – but we skipped it as Seth wouldn’t have had the patience to wait for us to complete the whole circuit while someone spoke to us in the ear.

Beijing9

We wandered into the City’s compounds. Large uneven stone pavements led us into courtyards and plazas, first into the ‘Outer Court’ where the government and official events took place, then into more intimate spaces like the ‘Inner Court’ where the emperors and their concubines dwelt and then through small doors into a whole new world of beautifully manicured bonsai gardens.

Beijing26

It’s incredibly fascinating to imagine what went on behind those wooden latticed doors. How did the emperors get from one place to another? It was too large to wander on foot, at least for an emperor. What secrets were told? How many people were tortured as the emperors were known to have ruled with an iron fist.

Marble-stoned bridges connected one plaza to another with shallow waters running past. The complex is a universe on its own – sufficient in every aspect – both spectacular, yet surreal.

Beijing10

After hours of walking, little Seth finally dozed off to sleep and we crossed the road and entered into Jingshan Park. We were told that an uphill climb up to one of its summits would guaranteed a full, clear panoramic view of the entire Forbidden City. The discovery was well worth the sweat. We reached a beautiful temple at the top and looked down at the ancient museum for a different perspective – it’s vast compound continued to bewilder us. I wondered, what commoners would pay just to get a glimpse into the Forbidden City in the past – as within its City’s walls lie many untold stories, shrouded with mystery.

Beijing2

No Comments on Tiananmen Square & The Forbidden City

If You’re Gonna Travel To See A Wall – Make it This One!

As a Chinese, I’ve grown up with stories of the Great Wall. Although from a Chinese descent, China has always seemed like a foreign land to me. As a young…

As a Chinese, I’ve grown up with stories of the Great Wall. Although from a Chinese descent, China has always seemed like a foreign land to me. As a young girl, the little I knew about her was that my grandfather came from China many moons ago, that the Great Wall is one magnificent wonder I should not miss and that panda’s are still around, albeit close to extinction.

My grandmother used to tell me stories of her trip to ‘the’ magnificent wall. Over the years, I’ve laid eyes on many postcard-worthy photos and even watched documentaries with detailed facts from history. Instinctively, as I grew more passionate about seeing the world, the Great Wall was way on top of my bucket list.

THIS IS WHAT I CAME TO CHINA FOR!

FullSizeRender 4

This timeless ruin completed in the Ming Dynasty to protect the Chinese empire from invasion against the Mongols is today one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites. Both a historical treasure and a man-made wonder, it is no surprise that thousands of tourists visit this site in busloads loads every day – yes, even in the thick of winter. One of the ways to beat the crowd is to get here early and to find sections of the wall that are least likely a choice mass tourists. The Badaling section is the most visited one out of the nine sections opened to tourists. We decided on Mutianyu to avoid the masses.

transsiberian_192

Located 70 kilometres northeast of Beijing in Huairou County, the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall is thought to be one of the best-preserved and longest sections of the wall. Since it is farther from the city, the crowds are less – but still we got there early, at 8am before the tour buses arrived at 10am.

The Great Wall at Mutianyu is 22 kilometres long and has 22 watchtowers – the highest of which reaches an altitude of 540 meters above sea level. Before we set foot on the wall, we had a choice to take the chairlift or walk the dauntingly steep stairs to get to the wall. We chose the latter without knowing that it would be that steep and got our morning workout sorted.

TerenceDeb_GreatWall

The first sight of the wall was unforgettable – the famous grey stoned-washed walls with unmistakable parapets stood before us bearing proof that this was once a defence fortress, hence the challenge of getting up there. The wall’s pathways are wide in some areas and narrow and uneven at other parts. Tall narrow stone steps led to watchtowers and eventually to Tower 1, the highest of the 22 towers.

transsiberian_180transsiberian_191When we finally got to Tower 1, the crowd was more evident. Casting our eyes along the wall, we saw pockets of people mostly posing for a picture, taking jump shots, waving selfie sticks in the air and making slow ascend to different watch towers. A tangible sense of awe is in the air – it’s hard not to appreciate a man-made structure like this.

transsiberian_168

According to history, during the initial stages of the wall built during the Qin Dynasty (way before the Ming Dynasty), bricklayers used glutinous rice flour as binding material for the wall. A more gruesome truth however, is that the Great Wall is synonymous to the ‘longest cemetery on Earth’. Human remains have been found buried under the wall according to leading archeologists. Many talk about the grand magnificence of the wall, but if the wall could speak, I am dead sure that it would tell of the millions of lives lost in the construction of it. Bitter cold winters, hazardous terrain and arduous labour contributed to tragedy. And today, many tourists – me included, stand in wonder of this piece of living history.

I echo the words of my two-year-old, Seth, “The Great Wall – very impressive!”.

IMG_0740

transsiberian_183IMG_0736I gazed out the window at Tower 1 and took in all that this place had to offer. There in my moment of silence, a strange calm came over. If only I could overnight here, I would – I’m sure my imagination and stories of the past would make great company.

Getting to Mutianyu

There are many sites that tell you how to get to Mutianyu Great Wall, but I found this one on China Highlights very practical and easy to follow. And if you can’t get enough of the wall or want to be the first early bird up on the wall, then staying at Mutianyu is the perfect option. The village at the foot of the Great Wall is an interesting one with many eateries, local guesthouses and tiny sundry shops. We stayed at the Brickyard Retreat and enjoyed unobstructed views of the Wall with complete privacy in our personal outdoor lounge.

1 Comment on If You’re Gonna Travel To See A Wall – Make it This One!

Photo Journal: Gunung Mulu National Park

Gunung Mulu National Park is remote, and is typically accessed by only one commercial flight, MAS Wings on a small twin otter airplane. The flight is quite frightful and rather…

Gunung Mulu National Park is remote, and is typically accessed by only one commercial flight, MAS Wings on a small twin otter airplane. The flight is quite frightful and rather different for those of us who are used to flying Boeing airplanes. This nature hideout holds much to discover and I’m glad it’s not flocked by mass tourists.

Located in east Malaysia’s Sarawak state, Gunung Mulu National Park, a World Heritage Site holds the world’s largest natural cave chamber, the Sarawak Chamber. Sprawling an enormous 700 meters in length, it is massive enough to fit an airplane. Another highlight of the park is the Pinnacles, a series of razor-sharp limestone peaks rising from the earth, a view unlike any other. Unfortunately when I visited Mulu a couple of years back, I wasn’t able to do any of the overnight hikes since I was in my first trimester.

Even then, I was able to glimpse at the wonderous beauty that Mulu has to offer in her rich biodiversity tucked in primary rainforest and nearby caves. My photo journal will tell a better story in the images captured this pristine natural wonderland.

Arriving at Mulu in a twin otter airplane. So glad the journey wasn’t long as I was getting antsy!
Arrivak (2)Arrivak (3)

Savouring wild bananas and was surprised to find crusty black seeds in them! The park was teeming with all sorts of native plants and some were devoured by insects leaving them hole ridden.

Day critters (1)Mulu National Park_Plants

Traveling upstream to the indigenous Penan community. Here they sold handmade handicraft and told stories of long gone.
Along the river (3)Along the river (5)Along the river (1)

Trekking to Deer Cave and Lang Cave was a lovely stroll, walking on well-maintained boardwalks under a dense canopy of rainforest trees. The trek to these caves would not be complete without bat sightings that take place every evening. Thousands of tiny Wrinkled-Lipped Bats rush out of the cave’s chambers in search for their night-time meals. The sight is nothing short of spectacular as they circle and form snaky-lines in the sky before dispersing into the forest.

Bats (2) Bats (5) Caves (8) Caves (9) Caves (12)

Night hikes are not to be missed! Upon nightfall, creepy critters come out to hunt for food. Within a 100 meter radius of the campsite, a variety of insects can be found. A word of caution, it’s not for the faint-hearted. If you’re afraid of insects and reptiles (like I am), stay in the middle of the group and carry a torchlight to light your path.

Day critters (6) Day critters (9)Mulu National Park_Fauna Mulu National Park_Fauna1

No Comments on Photo Journal: Gunung Mulu National Park

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search